Vehicles With Blue Lights Will Be Fined Under the New Road Traffic Act – See Posts

February 6, 2023 7:48 PM

Following the enactment of Jamaica’s Road Traffic Act 2018 (RTA 2018), the Jamaica Constabulary Force (JCF) continues to educate the public on the act’s new regulations, with their most recent advisory warning that vehicles with blue lights will be fined.

The JCF issued the advisory via their social media pages on Monday. The warning stated that “those pretty blue lights” would cost motorists.

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The force informed drivers that breaking Regulation 102(4) would attract a fine of $15,000 and that they should have them removed. While one viewer happily declared that he had his removed already, others poked fun at the new regulation, with one person declaring “a $9000 mi a pay because that is the minimum wage of the country.”

The JCF also advised motorists that obstructing or preventing an emergency vehicle from passing would attract a $25,000 fine. The force had warned earlier today that motorists who damaged road signs as a result of careless driving would be fined $50,000 under Regulation 203(3).

This was also met with humour by viewers, as one asked if they were referring to the ones that “are Already damaged? Or the ones (that) ARE NOT there.”

Additionally, under Regulation 249 (5), the employment of any vehicle other than a tow truck to move a vehicle on the toll road will costs motorists a fine of $20,000.

RELATED: PM Holness Will Re-examine the new Road Traffic Act After Outcry From Motorists about Child/Baby Seats

RTA 2018 replaced the Road Traffic Act of 1938 and was implemented on February 1. The legislation introduced a number of new offences and increased fines for some violations. Since its implementation, the act’s regulations have faced pushback from Public Passenger Vehicle (PPV) owners and the average motorists alike.

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Following massive public outcry, Prime Minister Andrew Holness recently announced that adjustments would be made to the rule that requires all vehicles to use a child restraint system.

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